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The future isn’t always bright

Written by Nick Dinsmoor

December 20, 2019

The future isn’t always bright

No one said innovation would be easy. For every iPhone and Cybertruck that hits the market, there are dozens of Galaxy Note 7’s, Google Glasses and 3D TV’s that can only be described as complete and utter failures.

Although this decade has brought incredible change and advancements in the world of tech and gadgets, it also came with its own series of flops. “It’s the decade of wearables, tablets, drones and burning batteries, and of ridiculous valuations for companies that were really good at hiding how little they actually had to offer,” says editors of The Verge.

Take a look at the top 84 “things” that quickly died… but not without leaving its mark on tech as we know it.

FAIL UP 

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